Wednesday, 17 January 2018
Daun Pegaga (Centella Asiatica)
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Centella asiatica is aquatic or semi-aquatic creeping herb, sending out runners (10-50 cm) like the strawberry, and forming patches on banks or streams and rivers. It is a somewhat succulent herb, sparingly hairy or nearly smooth, slightly aromatic herb, producing leaves, roots and fruits at the nodes. The dark green leaves are rounded to reinform held like an artist's palette on a long stalk. Leaves about 2-5 cm with crenate margin, 7-nerved, glabrous, or somewhat hairy when young. Petiles are about 5-10 cm long. Peduncles- fascicled, less than 1 cm long bearing 3-4 flowered simple umbel. Flowers are pink in color and small. The fruit is laterally compressed, orbicular.

Centella asiatica or locally known as Pegaga has been used for many centuries as a medicinal herbs. It has been used for treating dysentery, leucorrhoea, excessive secretion of gastric juices, urethritis arthiritis, rheumatism, treatment of liver and kidney and respiratory ailments. This herb is said to have a direct action in lowering blood pressure and are good source of natural antioxidant. It also believed to purify the blood, cure indigestion and good for mothers who have just given birth and preserving youthfulness. The extract of Centella asiatica is also proven to be an excellent ingredient for skin-care and cosmeceutical applications. It helps in wound healing and promotes epithelization of new cells.

References:

  1. Fetrow C, Avila J. Professional's Handbook of Complementary & Alternative Medicines. Springhouse, PA: Springhouse Corp.; 1999.
  2. Murray MT. The Healing Power of Herbs. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing, 1995, 173-183.
  3. Samy J., Sugumaran M., Lee Kate. L. W. (2005) Herbs of Malaysia: An introduction to the medicinal culinary, aromatic and cosmetic use of herbs. Times Editions, Selangor, Malaysia. 72-73.
  4. Kartnig T. Clinical applications of Centella asiatica (L) Urb. In Herbs, Spices, and Medicinal Plants: Recent Advances in Botany, Horticulture, and Pharmacology, vol. 3., Craker LE, Simon JE (eds). Phoenix, AZ: Oryx Press, 1986, 145-73.
  5. Kartnig T. Clinical applications of Centella asiatica (L) Urb. In Herbs, Spices, and Medicinal Plants: Recent Advances in Botany, Horticulture, and Pharmacology, vol. 3., Craker LE, Simon JE (eds). Phoenix, AZ: Oryx Press, 1986, 145-73.
  6. Murray MT. The Healing Power of Herbs. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing, 1995, 173-83.
 

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